smoke free class of 2000

A photo project on what it means to turn thirty to a generation of Americans.
www.kevintruong.com

Interview and photo by Kevin Truong
Aimee.  David Douglas High School.  Portland, Oregon.
KT:  So Aimee how do you feel about turning thirty?
AC:  No big deal.
KT:  How were your twenties for you?
AC:  Pretty good.  Bought the house, had the kids—
KT:  Two point five—
AC:  Yeah, one more—
KT:  One on the way, congratulations.
AC:  Yeah.
KT:  Well as a mother of two with one on the way, what’s the biggest hope for your children?
AC:  To be happy.  I mean really that’s it.  In whatever they do.
KT:  Can you remember having your first child?  How did that change you as a person?
AC:  It changed a lot.  Life is more meant for her and not for me anymore.  We were in a different state by ourselves when we had her, so we really had to grow up quick.
KT:  Well you actually married your high school sweet-heart, what’s the key to staying strong for—how many years have you been together?AC:  We’ve been together thirteen years, married almost eight.  And I have to say just love, respect, and communication.  Communication is a big part.  Laughs.
KT:  How was it the first time you guys moved away? You mentioned you were far away from your family.
AC:  It was OK, it actually made us stronger as a couple for sure.
KT:  And Jimmy was in the air force right?
AC:  Right.
KT:  For how many years?
AC:  For four years.
KT:  Still active?
AC:  He went to Air National Guard when we moved back here, because he couldn’t reenlist in his existing job.
KT:  Well as a military family do you have any insight into that aspect of American life?
AC:  I feel they treat us well.   I feel like there are families and  people outside the military that don’t realize when you sign up to the military, you know what you’re getting into.  They (people in the military) know what they’re doing, they know what they want to do.  A lot of America just thinks that we’re throwing people over there, when really that’s not the case.
KT:  Do you remember what the motivation was when Jimmy enlisted?
AC:  For him, he wanted purpose.  And I was along for the ride.  Laughs.
KT:  When you hear the word America, what does that mean to you?
AC:  It means freedom, but it’s not free.  It’s fought for obviously.
KT:  And what do you think of our country right now?
AC:  It’s a little lost.  
KT:  But you’re hopeful things will turn around?
AC:  I try to be, yes.  I feel that if we don’t put more emphasis on our childrens’ education then they’re not going to be able to pull us out.
KT:  And finally do you remember us being called the Smoke Free Class of 2000?
AC:  Oh yes.
KT:  And did you stay smoke free?
AC:  Oh yes.

Interview and photo by Kevin Truong

Aimee.  David Douglas High School.  Portland, Oregon.

KT:  So Aimee how do you feel about turning thirty?

AC:  No big deal.

KT:  How were your twenties for you?

AC:  Pretty good.  Bought the house, had the kids—

KT:  Two point five—

AC:  Yeah, one more—

KT:  One on the way, congratulations.

AC:  Yeah.

KT:  Well as a mother of two with one on the way, what’s the biggest hope for your children?

AC:  To be happy.  I mean really that’s it.  In whatever they do.

KT:  Can you remember having your first child?  How did that change you as a person?

AC:  It changed a lot.  Life is more meant for her and not for me anymore.  We were in a different state by ourselves when we had her, so we really had to grow up quick.

KT:  Well you actually married your high school sweet-heart, what’s the key to staying strong for—how many years have you been together?
AC:  We’ve been together thirteen years, married almost eight.  And I have to say just love, respect, and communication.  Communication is a big part.  Laughs.

KT:  How was it the first time you guys moved away? You mentioned you were far away from your family.

AC:  It was OK, it actually made us stronger as a couple for sure.

KT:  And Jimmy was in the air force right?

AC:  Right.

KT:  For how many years?

AC:  For four years.

KT:  Still active?

AC:  He went to Air National Guard when we moved back here, because he couldn’t reenlist in his existing job.

KT:  Well as a military family do you have any insight into that aspect of American life?

AC:  I feel they treat us well.   I feel like there are families and  people outside the military that don’t realize when you sign up to the military, you know what you’re getting into.  They (people in the military) know what they’re doing, they know what they want to do.  A lot of America just thinks that we’re throwing people over there, when really that’s not the case.

KT:  Do you remember what the motivation was when Jimmy enlisted?

AC:  For him, he wanted purpose.  And I was along for the ride.  Laughs.

KT:  When you hear the word America, what does that mean to you?

AC:  It means freedom, but it’s not free.  It’s fought for obviously.

KT:  And what do you think of our country right now?

AC:  It’s a little lost. 

KT:  But you’re hopeful things will turn around?

AC:  I try to be, yes.  I feel that if we don’t put more emphasis on our childrens’ education then they’re not going to be able to pull us out.

KT:  And finally do you remember us being called the Smoke Free Class of 2000?

AC:  Oh yes.

KT:  And did you stay smoke free?

AC:  Oh yes.